Posts Tagged Washington Irving

Still Haunting the Hudson Valley

Sunday, June 16th, 2019 | Permalink

Rip Van Winkle statue
Irvington, NY

When Washington Irving wrote about headless horsemen, time-travelling husbands, and nine-pin ghost bowlers, he had no idea his Gothic tales would resonate throughout the years to the 21st century. Nor could he have imagined the Hudson River Valley would still prickle our necks and inspire our imaginations with its haunted churches, abandoned colleges, and deserted hospitals.

Halcyon Hall, Bennett College

Since my wife and I moved to Poughkeepsie some months ago, we’ve glimpsed along the roadways some of these once-proud and utile edifices. The first we encountered stands at the fork of County Highway 44 and 343 outside the village of Millbrook, NY. The former home of Bennett College and the Bennett School for Girls, the site is now graced by the burned-out hulk of Halcyon Hall, a Queen Ann-styled structure once the School’s administrative building “meant for the wealthy to hide away and curl up among the Hall’s cozy rooms and nooks with a good book” according to untappedcities.com.

Harlem Valley
Psychiatric Center

Another imposing structure dominates the landscape along Route 22 in Wingate. Once a bustling rehabilitation Center for psychiatric patients in upstate New York, the Harlem Valley Psychiatric Center treated over 5000 patients on its 800-acre campus. At the forefront of treatment during its heyday, the Center owns a list of now-dubious achievements: the first asylum in the 1930s to use insulin-shock therapy and later, a leader in electroshock therapies and frontal lobotomies.

Christ Episcopal Church
Poughkeepsie

And finally we have Christ Episcopal Church in Poughkeepsie. Built in 1766, the current structure on 20 Carroll Street, erected in 1888, has not one but three ghosts haunting the place. The first, Rev. Alexander Cummings, expresses his displeasure about change by blowing out candles and moving things around. The second, the ghost of a lady who died during a sermon, still haunts the pew where she expired. The third, described as “a rather crabby presence,” by the parishioners appears and disappears in the shape of a bat.

This last entry was the only one of the three to make Patch.com’s top-ten list of the “Best Real Haunted Places in the Hudson Valley.” I’m sure we’ll visit some of the others in the near future, but given this brief exposure to the Valley’s architecture and history, it appears that the legacy of Irving’s brand of Gothic horror lives on in the abandoned buildings of the Hudson River Valley.