Profile: Dr. Victor Furst

Taking a tip out of the Inkers Con playbook, I’ve placed a character description and brief interview with the main character in my Escape from the Immortals series, Dr. Victor Furst. Shown below is his character profile:

  1. Dr. Victor Furst
  2. Occupation—shamanic psychotherapist
  3. Conflicts—loves his ex-wife, Evelyn, but deeply resents his daughter-in-name only, Miriam. Feels he was forced to break his professional vows in using his shamanic abilities to kill her biological father, Boris Zarkisian, the material world leader of the psychic vampires, the New Immortals.
  4. Motivations—to regain Evelyn’s love and trust, behave ethically as healer.  
  5. Traits—Athletic, tends to be snide under duress.’

Physical description: Tall (6′ 3″), lanky, with a shock of salt-and-ginger hair and trimmed beard to match, plus a pair of clinically penetrating blue eyes.

Interview begins:

whf: You’re portrayed in the first book of the series, Mission: Soul Rescue, and its upcoming sequel, Mission: Soul Sacrifice, as an emotionally conflicted character. Why?

vf: It seems to me a natural response as a professional psychotherapist/shaman and as a parent to feel conflicted. Our first duty as a shaman and as a therapist is to do no harm. Not only does that mean no harm either physically or psychologically to the individual patient, but also to the ones around him/her, their significant others, friends, family, etc. As a parent I realize I may have violated that vow when I left my family to do research in the Amazon and become a shaman. Though it was done to protect them from the machinations of Dr. Basil Zarkisian doesn’t mitigate the profound psychological impact my absence had upon my family, particularly on our daughter, Miriam. The fact my actions may help save the world from the predations of those psychic vampires, the New Immortals, ameliorates the guilt I feel somewhat, but it doesn’t justify them.

whf: Do you feel your role in the story is one of expiating guilt then?

vf: It may be, but I hope not, not solely at least. It’s a funny thing–part of the time I’m recognized as a hero. In ordinary reality I rescue my wife’s soul and reintegrate it into her conscious self. In the Lower World of her unconscious reality, I play the role of Vahagn, the Hercules of Armenian myth, whose destiny is to prevent Ahriman, chief of the Zoroastrian gods, from seizing dominion of the Lower World, entering ordinary reality, and ruling over the universe for all eternity. Yet, despite this lofty calling, I’m viewed as a failure and an anathema within my own family, one whose welfare I hoped to protect by redirecting elsewhere the attention of those forces seeking to harm them. Ironic, isn’t it?

whf: One last question–you sound bitter. Are you?

vf: I hope not. Frustrated and bewildered, maybe, but not bitter. I’m enough of a professional to understand why my feelings, though justified perhaps, should not interfere with my judgments toward helping my patient(s) feel better about themselves by becoming whole spiritually and psychologically. At the same time, that understanding doesn’t mitigate the hurt and resentment I feel toward their unwillingness, no–inability, to recognize the good intentions behind some of my actions and forgive them.

(Sighs and flashes a crooked smile). Yeah, maybe a little bitter.

What do you think? Does Victor seem bitter? Defensive? Or just uncertain? Let me know your thoughts in the Comments section below.

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