Posts Tagged Shaman

Visionary Fiction

Saturday, May 6th, 2017 | Permalink

A week or so ago I indulged in the guilty pleasure of viewing the ranking and ratings of my new novel, Mission: Soul Rescue, on amazon.com. While the customer ratings were high and its ranking was low (More reviews needed–c’mon, guys), what surprised me most was its inclusion in the Kindle format under the categories of metaphysical and visionary fiction.

Though the story concerns rescues from the unconscious realm and its protagonist is a shamanic therapist, I never considered my book to be anything more than an adventure thriller with supernatural overtones–until I looked up the definition on Wikipedia (handy pipeline to many unusual topics regardless what its detractors say). Recognized as a new and distinct literary genre by the Book Industry Study Group in 2000, the entry states visionary fiction is “a literary form that illustrates the process of growth in human consciousness. While it contains an all-inclusive spiritual component and often makes use of paranormal modes of perception, it employs story elements like plot, character, and setting to immerse the reader in a drama of evolving awareness—rather than an exposition of specific teachings or practices.”

The source of that quote originates with the Visionary Fiction Alliance, a group of like-minded authors and readers that formed in 2012. Like most authors, I’ve engaged in a vain search for readers who understand the meaning of the word “novel” and enjoy extending their minds into new frontiers of imagination and reality. After exploring the VFA site, I realized that M:SR has found a home. Here’s the link to their web site:

Home – Visionary Fiction Alliance

Look around, check out some of the entries. You might find you’ve discovered your new source for thought, reflection, and pleasure.

Discovering cunning folk

Saturday, December 6th, 2014 | Permalink

Year51JvlAscCPL._AA160_As ago a contemporary of the Wisconsin State Journal‘s Roundy Coughlin wrote an occasional column about things he’d discovered on the way to other things. By the same route, my researches uncovered a group of healers that receive little attention in the reference books: cunning folk.

My forthcoming novel, The New Immortals, contains a number of familiar animals or spirit guides which British historian and folk expert Emma Wilby says “were supernatural entities believed to assist witches and cunning folk in their practice of magic” during Medieval and early modern times. Her book on the topic, Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits: Shamanistic Vicsionary Traditions in Early Modern Bristish Witchcraft and Magic, has been extolled by fellow historian, Marion Gibson, for making “a strong case for a British shamanic tradition.”

Given thee subtitle of Wilby’s book and her background, the book also presents a strong case in behalf of shamanism in the Western European cultural and healing traditions. The cunning folk of Sweden, Germany, Italy, and200px-Cunning_Woman A Wales along with their familiars resemble in many ways the shamans of Siberia, India, and South America with their reliance upon power animals to interact with the spirit world and channel those energies into the material world. My novel takes this one step farther by having a psychologist combine the practices of his profession with the shamanic traditions of  the native South American Quechuas to combat the followers of the ancient Zoroastrian god Ahura Mazda. If Furst fails in his quest, he stands to lose not only his wife and family, but his very soul to the race of psychic parasites called the Anausaveds by the ancient Persians which translates as the New Immortals.

Many indigenous cultures disparage Western practitioners of shamanism as “plastic shamans” for misappropriating their ancient traditions. Due to a felicitous bit of research, it appears that Western culture has a strong, healthy shamanic tradition of its own in the guise of the cunning folk of western and central Europe. The realms of the human spirit and the unconscious would seem broad enough to encompass healers from all cultures regardless of origin.Бэликто A