Posts Tagged Crime

Criminal Offenders and Mental Judo

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017 | Permalink

Ever dream of thwarting an attacker in a vacant parking lot? Or of putting a bully in his place at work? Or wonder why such people act the way they do?

We all have–in books and movies. Frank Weber, the evening’s speaker for the September meeting of the Twin Cities Sisters in Crime writing group, does this for a living. A trained clinical and forensic psychologist as well as a recently-published mystery writer (Murder Book, North Star Press), Weber treats these and many other types of aberrant and anti-social behaviors as Director of CORE Professional Services, PA. A disciple of criminal psychology researcher Robert Hare, Weber’s success as a therapist takes a two-pronged approach: seeing problems correctly and utilizing mental judo in interpersonal situations.

Regarding the first one, Weber supplied a variety of statistics to show that many commonly held beliefs about America’s social problems, its criminals and its mentally ill are misconceptions. For example, though the number of minority teen pregnancies is twice or more than that of white teenagers, the ratio of teens giving birth in each group is approximately equal, roughly 25%. So the incidence of teen pregnancy, which has been declining for years, is really a function of poverty rather than of moral decline. The same can be said for homicides, sexual assault, and drug use, all of which peaked before or during the mid-1990s and have declined ever since. In Frank’s opinion, the current alarm over these behaviors stems from the fact that “nobody ever talked about [them] before.”

As for the mental judo aspect, Frank’s discussion proved more personal and anecdotal. To deal with defiantly unresponsive teenagers, Frank employs reverse psychology, responding to their sullen defiance by stating his relief that they don’t talk–which prompts them to start talking immediately. With narcissists, Frank appeals to their innate need to be better than everyone else by challenging them to make positive contributions in their personal interactions. The important thing is to have them “focus upon doing something” counter to their previous behavior.

To accomplish these behavioral changes, Frank advocates four characteristics that mark non-deviant people:

    1. Attachment to people
    2. Involvement in activities
    3. Commitment to a goal
    4. Belief (morals) in something or someone

Weber admitted that not every criminal offender is susceptible to treatment, but most of them do seek the light at the end of the tunnel. They “just need help finding the tunnel.” Often that effort requires a change in the therapist’s point of view to help that patient discover the light. Perhaps if society employed a little mental judo of its own, the change of perspective might reach beyond the realm of fiction and supply the empathy criminal offenders need to start building a new and positive lives for themselves and the people around them.

A Lesson Repeated at the Creatures, Crimes, and Creativity Conference

Sunday, October 27th, 2013 | Permalink

One thing the keynote speakers at this conference did that speakers at many other conferences don’t do is discuss the amount of labor involved. When writers discuss the “iceberg approach” to their writing, they could as easily refer to the amount of person hours involved as the technique that implies something deep lies beneath the surface of their narratives.

Jeffrey Deaver was quite upfront about the work aspect during his Saturday night keynote address when he pronounced writing “is a business.” When he started out he was like most novices “who like and write books as we all do.” But as he became more proficient at his craft, he realized that even though he enjoyed being “paid to make up things,” he also found particular aspects of his profession that he detested, particularly what he calls the “dreaded explanatory” chapter in which the author has to wrap up the loose threads and make sense of them for the reader. More and more he found himself “to hate, hate, HATE writing those chapters” and putting off the chore until he absolutely had to.

Allison Leotta equated her work day to that of juggler’s who wonders “which balls will be dropped.” This “female John Grisham,” as one reviewer called her, realized after publishing her first book that she needed to spend two hours a day just for marketing to “build an author platform.” And if she were to meet her ambition and reverse the simile, i.e., for Grisham to become regarded as the “male Allison Leottta,” she would need to work doubly hard and “really have to hone my talents.”

All too often, novice writers (me included), regard writing as a matter of a seamless process of inspiration, perspiration, production, and adulation. After a book or two, they figure they have reached the starry firmament where they can rely on the strength of their reputation to communicate with their readers. Celebrity authors aside, few professional writers have such luxury. Each novel builds upon the ones that precede it which ups the ante on the reception the current publication receives. For that novel or short story to be a success with the public and for the author, a writer must conclude sooner rather than later as Ms. Leotta and the attendees at this conference have, that the writing life is all “about working your ass off all the time.”

To view my photos of the C3 conference, check out my Facebook page at:

https://www.facebook.com/william.fietzer/media_set?set=a.4645617317360.1073741829.1800969976&type=3