Police and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Tuesday night (3/7/17) the guest speaker at the Twin Cities Sisters in Crime monthly meeting was Christian Dobratz, an assistant professor at Mankato State University in the department of public administration. His topic: Law enforcement survival, particularly in regards to the ravages of post traumatic stress disorder upon police department officers.

His credentials for presenting such a topic and discussion are impressive. Not only does he teach courses on the topic at Mankato State along with tactical communications and criminal investigations, he also has served as a patrol officer, deputy sheriff, and detective/drug task force assistant coordinator for Carver County. In those roles he witnessed a number of fellow officers and colleagues who suffered the ravages of PTSD on their personal lives ultimately leading to their suicides.

But it was his personal narrative as “a survivor” of accumulative, job-related PTSD events that made his presentation to the 50 or so members in attendance compelling. His account of dealing with one inhumane, neglectful, even cruel mistreatment of children by parents or guardians after another without time for decompression or analysis built an air-tight case for providing the seeds of his ultimate emotional and mental breakdown after investigating the fiery deaths of three pre-teenage boys due to child neglect.

Though the circumstances of this case were no more extraordinary than others he had investigated, the cumulative effect of those incidents eroded his professional reserve to the point that his successful investigation and ultimate prosecution of the adults responsible opened the floodgates of all his repressed emotions and rendered him unable to fulfill his professional police obligations and responsibilities. The tragedy of his story is how police administrations and its culture until recently chose to sweep PTSD-provoking occurrences under the rug and discredit or ridicule those officers who experienced them.

For a group of authors and writers from which many choose to make police procedurals and criminal investigations the central focus in their writings, Mr. Dobratz’s anecdotally-supported presentation proved revelatory and riveting. His call for more citizen understanding and support for social and psychological therapy as well as administrative change and assistance received an enthusiastic burst of applause at presentation’s end.

Professor Bobratz’ web page can be reached at: http://sbs.mnsu.edu/government/faculty/dobratz.html

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