Archive for March, 2017

My interview with David Alan Binder

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017 | Permalink

David Alan Binder is an author who has interviewed over 200 writers, fiction and non-fiction in various genres. His questions reflect the emotional eddies and cross-currents that make up a writer’s interior life. My answers are particularly revealing in light of the several narratives that occur in Mission: Soul Rescue. The link to my answers appears below:


http://sites.google.com/site/dalanbinder/blog/williamfietzerinterviewwithdavidalanbinder

What do you think?

Dinner at Eight: Only the Hearty Go On

Friday, March 10th, 2017 | Permalink

Thursday evening the Minnesota Opera hosted the social media presentation of their upcoming opera, Dinner at Eight. As the final dress rehearsal for its world premiere (March 11), the performance had its share of missteps and repeats, but overall it captivated the audience with its mordant, bitter sweet score and its spare, art deco staging of a legendary era in Broadway high society that may never have existed.

Based upon the very successful stage play by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber, this new opera plays against the pathos of the character types embodied in the Hollywood version in 1933. Whereas ruined lives caused by the Great Depression were very much a part of 1930s zeitgeist, here the haute couteur dinner attendees emerge as ruthless, sometimes resigned survivors of the unending Darwinian struggle to maintain social status.

As a result, composer William Bolcom’s musical score hovers primarily in the minor keys to undercut the folly of the hostess’ social aspirations and underscore the anguish of a fading silent movie idol too vain and too self-medicated to accept the loss of his former stature. Mark Campbell’s lyrics, though straining for cleverness during the opening chorus, do capture the hope, humor, and/or despair that motivates each of the characters throughout this operatic Vanity Fair.

If the performers held back to save their voices, it wasn’t evident in this dress rehearsal. Mary Dunleavy as the socialite wife Millicent Jordan, Stephen Powell as her ineffectual businessman/husband, Brenda Harris as the exuberant aging actress, Carlotta Vance, and the rest of the cast sang their parts with gusto. Their characters may appear foolish in the triviality of their aspirations, but the actors embodied them with emotional conviction.

All in all, the opera Dinner at Eight is a wise, funny, and ironic commentary on the aspirations and motivations that mark the human condition. Enjoy one of the performances on either March 11 (world premiere), March 16, or March 18 and 19. Social media followers can receive a $25/ticket discount for the Sunday March 19th performance by using Coupon Code: lobster25 for purchase at mnopera.org/dinner-at-eight or 612-333-6669.

Police and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Thursday, March 9th, 2017 | Permalink

Tuesday night (3/7/17) the guest speaker at the Twin Cities Sisters in Crime monthly meeting was Christian Dobratz, an assistant professor at Mankato State University in the department of public administration. His topic: Law enforcement survival, particularly in regards to the ravages of post traumatic stress disorder upon police department officers.

His credentials for presenting such a topic and discussion are impressive. Not only does he teach courses on the topic at Mankato State along with tactical communications and criminal investigations, he also has served as a patrol officer, deputy sheriff, and detective/drug task force assistant coordinator for Carver County. In those roles he witnessed a number of fellow officers and colleagues who suffered the ravages of PTSD on their personal lives ultimately leading to their suicides.

But it was his personal narrative as “a survivor” of accumulative, job-related PTSD events that made his presentation to the 50 or so members in attendance compelling. His account of dealing with one inhumane, neglectful, even cruel mistreatment of children by parents or guardians after another without time for decompression or analysis built an air-tight case for providing the seeds of his ultimate emotional and mental breakdown after investigating the fiery deaths of three pre-teenage boys due to child neglect.

Though the circumstances of this case were no more extraordinary than others he had investigated, the cumulative effect of those incidents eroded his professional reserve to the point that his successful investigation and ultimate prosecution of the adults responsible opened the floodgates of all his repressed emotions and rendered him unable to fulfill his professional police obligations and responsibilities. The tragedy of his story is how police administrations and its culture until recently chose to sweep PTSD-provoking occurrences under the rug and discredit or ridicule those officers who experienced them.

For a group of authors and writers from which many choose to make police procedurals and criminal investigations the central focus in their writings, Mr. Dobratz’s anecdotally-supported presentation proved revelatory and riveting. His call for more citizen understanding and support for social and psychological therapy as well as administrative change and assistance received an enthusiastic burst of applause at presentation’s end.

Professor Bobratz’ web page can be reached at: http://sbs.mnsu.edu/government/faculty/dobratz.html